Category: Critical Thought

Women in the Archives Resource List

Women, Archives & Self-Preservation Please see the list below of women, primarily women of color, in the archives. We see this list as inclusive of diverse voices and critical perspectives to center marginalized voices. These are narratives not often included or highlighted in the history texts, and therefore are not part of the historical canon. […]

Read More

The Artist or the Developer, Which Came First?

Cities change and art changes with them. I had actually meant to write this post some time ago. I had returned from a trip in Philadelphia in which I took a mural tour with the Mural Arts program for their “A Love Letter for You” train tour, a series of murals done by renown artist […]

Read More
Decolonizing Genders, Bodies, and Minds

Decolonizing Genders, Bodies, and Minds

Last week, I returned to one of my favorite museums and favorite events in DC for the Fresh Talk for Change series at National Museum of Women in the Arts. If you’re a longtime follower of the blog, you might recognize that series from previous posts, and this evening absolutely continued the dedication to conversation and change that #FreshTalk4Change and the NMWA are all about. Previous talks focused on female artists and creating spaces for diverse voices to be heard (a passion of ours here at BGMB too!), but in the most recent Fresh Talk, we gathered to consider an even more radical change: a new understanding of gender as it impacts design.

Read More

The Empty Seat Beside You

It is of no surprise that inclusion and diversity are hot topics, or that my inbox has been flooded with CFPs for conferences on the subject of revolution, protest, and social justice. #BlackLivesMatter has shaken up the Twitterverse and caused various institutions and disciplines to reevaluate modes of access to the field and the viability of […]

Read More

Painting Black Flesh into History

The first thing people do is pull out their phones or their cameras, without actually checking or asking first. So I feel like I’m on display. And it actually cheapens what I’ve been doing  because they’re not getting the real story… David Ibata is a copyist at the National Gallery of Art. For 4 years […]

Read More

Planting Seeds, Finding Roots

Did you miss me?!…Back from Europe and I have so much on my mind––if only I could tip my head and dump it all out––so I apologize now if this post is longwinded. I made an expedition to Germany for 2 weeks to visit a cousin. The only things on my itinerary: see as many museums as possible and explore my surroundings. The rest would come as my trip unfolded. I started my trip in Frankfurt, Germany, where I would be staying in a wonderful hostel in Frankfurt’s Red Light District (yes, that district).

Read More

Making Bodies Legible

Last week I visited the Facing History exhibit of Shirin Neshat’s work at the Hirshhorn Museum (which I’m excited to share with you in an upcoming exhibit review) and was struck by the attention to physical bodies in her work. It’s no secret that attention to bodies as sites of violence is a key component of my academic work, but after seeing Neshat’s photography and short films, I spend the next few days thinking about the ways we can keep the role of the physical body legible in critiques of war and colonialism. My research (and some great tweets from my followers!) led me to Bodies of Violence: Theorizing Embodied Subjects in International Relations, by Lauren Wilcox, a book which cuts right to the heart of what I found most fascinating about Neshat’s art.

Read More
Austerity Myths and Darkening Detroit

Austerity Myths and Darkening Detroit

On the heels of my conference presentation at the University of Brighton, where I spoke about international trade and Juarez femicide, I’m glad to be back for this week’s blog bite to talk about a similar issue of neoliberal violence in two articles: “Austerity Isn’t Irrational” by John Milios at Jacobin, and “Detroit: A Case Study of Oligarchs and Vigilantes Taking Over Public Safety in a Big City” by Patrick Sheehan at Naked Capitalism. Whether you’re following GREXIT and the European Union in the news lately, or staying focused on poverty and privatization in American communities, these two articles both speak to the myth of austerity practices that slash social services in the hopes of furthering economic growth.

Read More

The Journey for Regina: Deconstructing the Black Monolith

Meet the ladies of Nkem Life (pronounced en-khem meaning “my” or “my own”), a lifestyle blog that combines the artistry, culture, and intelligence of the Nigerian-American sister duo, Chidinma “Chi-Chi” Dureke and Chuckwunonso “Angel” Dureke. I had the opportunity of meeting them Saturday, June 27th, for their art showcase entitled “The Journey for Regina,” a visual conversation about blackness, culture, Africa and natural hair. The showcase was held in the ethnic apparel boutique Nubian Hueman within the Anacostia Arts Center, a center I plan to enjoy more of in the future.

Read More
The Road Well Travelled

The Road Well Travelled

As you may have heard, I recently returned from a Chicago trip. As I’ve made known, I’m from the area…well, technically. But if I’m really to speak in my truth, I grew up in the outer suburbs in which an actual Chicagoan would shun me for claiming the city. However, this trip was an opportunity […]

Read More